CAN DOGS EAT SAUSAGES? [PARASITE INFECTION]


There’s something very eerie about how sausages and dogs are connected 😉 Outside of the obvious name connection (‘hot dogs’),  virtually all of the dog breeds are drawn to sausages like magnets. 

I have a labrador named Charlie who is the worst at guarding and protecting. His laziness is only surpassed by his friendly demeanour. However, if you cook a sausage an put on the table to cool off, he becomes something else. His eyes become laser focused, his stance — rigid and he will not, and I repeat will not take his eyes off of the table no matter what you do to him;)

If you’re anything like me, you’re a sucked for your furry friend. I’ve been tempted on more than one occasion to give my dog a piece of sausage as I’ve been cooking. So, should you give your dog a piece of sausage?

can dogs eat sausages?

Can dogs eat sausage?

While most of the proteins humans eat are more than okay to feed to your dog if prepared properly, it’s not the best idea to give your dog a piece of sausage. Because sausage tends to be very greasy, salty, and oily, it’s harder on your dog’s stomach.

If you’ve dropped a piece of sausage and your dog beat you to the clean-up, don’t panic. Small amounts of sausage aren’t going to cause any problems for your dog. But I still would avoid feeding them sausage all together.

Why Sausage Can Be Bad For Dogs

Sausage is a very greasy and salty protein. While this is a delicious protein for humans, grease and salt are not good for man’s best friend.

The combination of oil, grease and salt can cause your dog to vomit, have diarrhea, or change their demeanor overall because they don’t feel well.

Many prepackaged sausages contain a lot of seasonings that are not healthy for your dog. Seasonings such as onion powder, garlic powder, and spicy additives are not something you want your dog eating. Not only are dogs allergic to onions and garlic, anything spicy is known to upset their stomachs. When your dog’s stomach is upset, accidents can happen and I don’t know about you, but I don’t enjoy having to clean up dog vomit.

If your dog gets its paws on uncooked sausage or sausage that has been contaminated because it’s been left out for too long, it’s possible that they may develop a parasite infection known as Trichinosis. Luckily, this is a treatable infection, but you can avoid it by not giving them sausage, no matter how bad they beg.

How to Feed Sausage to Dogs

While it’s not a good idea to feed sausage to your dog, if you really want to, there are ways to do it safely.

The first step is to ensure you’re giving them sausage that has no added seasoning from you or the manufacturer. After it’s been cooked, remove as much grease as possible to avoid upsetting their stomach further.

How Much Sausage Should I Feed my Dog

If you are going to feed sausage to your best friend, you’ll want to do so in very small amounts. Giving your dog a piece of sausage here and there won’t have any adverse effects on their health, but you don’t want to give them a little bit every day.

What Food to Give Your Dog Instead of Sausage

There are plenty of other human foods that you can give your dog that is better for them than sausage. Some of my favorite proteins to give to my dog are plain chicken and lean beef.

Other delicious foods you can share with your dog include white rice, pumpkin, and plenty of veggies. You can even share the fruit with them in moderation. You’ll want to be careful with fruit since they naturally have sugar in them.

Are Dogs Allergic to Sausage?

Not technically. Now, if your sausage contains known dog allergens such as onion and garlic powder, then yes. Ham and pork are not officially known as allergens for dogs, but they can lead to an upset stomach.

Can Diabetic Dogs Eat Sausage?

I wouldn’t feed a diabetic dog sausage. Diabetic dogs need a carefully planned diet that works well with their insulin shots. Even if you cook your diabetic dog their food, you will want to avoid sausage, even if it’s plain. Sausage without seasoning is still incredibly greasy by nature and is not a good protein option for a diabetic dog. The added grease and fat may cause more weight gain.

 

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